Why do Writers Write in Coffee Shops?

Thanks to Robin Storey for this article, musing about the writer’s life. Enjoy!

MO

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Since becoming a full-time writer I’ve become a cliché – I love writing in coffee shops. I’ve written in a previous postabout my local library being my favourite office away from home, but coffee shops come in as equal favourite.

IT’S A TRADITION

In my defence, I’m continuing to uphold a fine and noble tradition of writers working in coffee shops and cafes, from TS Elliott, Franz Kafka, Gertrude Stein and F Scott Fitzgerald to many modern writers. The most famous is J.K. Rowling, who wrote much of her early Harry Potter novels in the Elephant House in Edinburgh.

An urban myth grew up that she wrote there because she couldn’t afford heating in her flat. But she disputed this in a radio interview, saying that walking her baby in her pram to the coffee shop put her to sleep (the baby, not J.K.), which gave her free time to write.

The Elephant House must have a great creative vibe, as Inspector Rebus creator Ian Rankin and The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency author Alexander McCall Smith have also slaved away there. When I was in Edinburgh a few years ago I visited the Elephant House and had a coffee there. I sat in the back room where JK Rowling had sat overlooking Edinburgh Castle and imagined myself in her shoes, scribbling away madly to get as much done before the baby woke up, wrestling the demons in her mind that told her it was crap and no-one would ever publish it. (I am taking a bit of literary licence here, as I have never heard her admit to the demons, but as most writers experience them, especially with their first novels, I think I’m safe in this assumption). May Lord Voldemort cast a curse on me and torture me with snakes if I’m wrong.

THERE ARE MANY THEORIES

Theories abound as to why writers are attracted to coffee shops. One of the main reasons may be visibility. Psychologists say that for a role to be internalized, it has to be observed in public. As writing is a solitary occupation, maybe we writers feel the need to be acknowledged, that we think we’re not real writers unless people see us writing. Or it could just be pure pretension.

The problem with that observation is that it’s so commonplace these days for all types of business people to sit in coffee shops tapping away on their laptops or tablets that unless you have a sign beside you saying ‘Writer at Work,’ no-one else has a clue what you’re writing.

TIP: Try looking up from your work occasionally, staring pensively into the distance as if invoking the Muse, then resume writing furiously as inspiration has suddenly struck you. This, combined with the occasional sigh or creased brow, will signal to other patrons that you’re not just writing an email to Mum or the annual shareholders’ report, but are engaged in an Important Creative Process.

I don’t have a favourite coffee shop – part of the fun is going to a different one each time. The surrounding buzz and chatter provides just the right amount of background noise for me to be able to focus on my work. The big plus is that there are no distractions, (apart from eavesdropping and people watching, but they are part of a writer’s job description) so I can’t put off my writing by doing the washing or taking a nap on the couch.

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT

For those who still want that same vibe without leaving home, there’s an app called Coffitivity, that provides background coffee shop noise. But not, of course, the ambience – to a coffee shop purist, it’s like serving them instant coffee and trying to convince them it’s the real thing. Unless the app comes with the aroma of fresh coffee beans (high on my list of favourite things) and a barista who makes a full-bodied heart-starter of a cappuccino, I’m not interested.

IT’S FUN AND PRODUCTIVE

There’s also an element of fun in writing in coffee shops – it doesn’t feel like work. Non-fiction author Malcolm Gladwell of The Tipping Point and Blink Fame, long ago eschewed his office in favour of cafes and restaurants. He’s quoted as saying, ‘Writing seems like a fun activity now… it’s more seamlessly integrated into my life and that’s made it much more pleasurable.’

Many writers, myself included, find our productivity is highest when writing in coffee shops, especially when we’re in creative, first draft mode. Psychologists say that when we’re alone in a public space we have a fear of being seen to have no purpose. So we think it’s not acceptable to sit in a coffee shop alone if we’re not doing something – which explains why non-writers who frequent restaurants and cafes alone usually engage in some activity to look busy – check their phones, read a book or magazine etc. If we’re seen to be doing something purposeful, we can’t be accused of loitering and management are less likely to throw us out – even if we’ve been there for two hours and only had one coffee.

THERE’S A TIME LIMIT

And that brings me to the main disadvantage of writing in coffee shops – limited time. Just how long is it acceptable to sit in a coffee shop on the strength of one coffee? It’s not that I’m mean – I’m not able to drink more than one cup of coffee in the space of a few hours. I make it last as long as I can, but one hour is usually my limit. After that, I feel as if I’m overextending my welcome. It does mean that I get a lot of writing done in that hour, but then I have to get up and go elsewhere – usually the library.

I’ve heard of writers spending all day writing in the one coffee shop. I can only assume they eat their lunch there and drink copious amounts of coffee during the day to keep the management on side. One writer I know of turns up to his favourite coffee shop each morning at 7am when they open and is there until 6pm. That’s true dedication for you. Or caffeine addiction.

THIS NOVEL IS SPONSORED BY MY LOCAL CAFE

At the very least, he’d have to offer the proprietor a free, signed copy of his book upon publication. Unless, of course, the coffee shop was sponsoring his novel. Which, come to think of it, is not a bad idea. In return for the privilege of ensconcing myself all day in my local coffee shop with a constant supply of coffee, delicacies and neck rubs, I’d be more than happy to have inscribed on the cover of my next novel ‘Sponsored by The Raw Bean Cafe’ and even the odd ad inside.

The possibilities are endless.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Do you think writers in coffee shops should have an arrow pointing at them that says, ‘Pretentious Arty Type?’ Should they be entitled to free coffee in exchange for a certain number of words (eg every 1000 words = one large latte with an extra shot), or failing that, tea and sympathy?

Chime in, writers and non-writers alike.

 

Reblogged from:

http://storey-lines.com/2015/09/14/why-do-writers-love-to-write-in-coffee-shops/

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The three minute read that will make you a great writer

Thank you Ravi for this most excellent post!

Mo

The 3-Minute Read that Will Make You A Great Writer

20 Amazing Writing ideas,which I got,while stuck in Traffic

Today again, I got stuck in traffic jam, as part of my daily routine.

But, today was a bit different, I did not get frustrated, angry or cursed at someone. I faced toxic fumes, incessant rain and notorious drivers, but still did not lose my cool. In fact, I was a tad sad, when the jam was over!!

Why?

Because Today, I utilized my traffic-jammed time effectively and used it to come up with great writing ideas. I was planning it for a long time now and Today was the day when I achieved it finally!

So My Amazing IDEAS, good, bad or ugly,are as follows-:

#1 After Inhaling Toxic Fumes and Deadly Smog

Blogging Idea #1

Toxic People kill productivity, here is How.

#2 After Missing Boss’s “Urgent” Meeting

Blogging Idea #2

10 Practical Ways to Pacify, an Angry Boss.

#3 After Attending an “Important” telephonic meeting with “Urgent” action items.

Blogging Idea #3

I do not believe in work life Balance.

#4 After Spilling scalding coffee, over my Laptop

Blogging Idea #4

Multitasking is killing your brain.

#5 After Hearing stale radio jokes, again and again.

Blogging Idea #5

10 Fabulous ways to take charge of your life, by being humorous.

#6 After Envying a sparkling red Ferrari.

Blogging Idea #6

The 1 surprising Reason, you will never become RICH.

#7 After Eyeing a cute redhead, in the same Ferrari

Blogging Idea #7

When is the last time, a cute girl checked you out?

#8 After Missing a desperate job interview.

Blogging Idea #8

Your Job search isn’t going anywhere. Here is Why.

#9 After Missing my marriage anniversary dinner

Blogging Idea #9

10 Time tested Amazing ways, to attain Nirvana

#10 After Barely surviving a potential Car crash.

Blogging Idea #10

4 Valuable life lessons I learned, after Cheating Death.

#11 After Your toddler screams “Potty, Potty”.

Blogging Idea #11

4 Powerful Leadership lessons, we learn from Children.

#12 After A throbbing toothache becomes vicious.

Blogging Idea #12

Procrastination is not helping your goals. Here is Why.

#13 After Missing a goddamned important flight

Blogging Idea #13

20 Amazing inventions, that will redefine travelling in the future.

#14 After Your car air conditioner suddenly goes KAPUT.

Blogging Idea #14

If you wish to Succeed, be Resilient to Failure.

#15 After Getting a BREAKUP message from my Lover

Blogging Idea #15

This is how, Love f**k*d my great career.

#16 After Doing “Forced” chitchat with the guy next car.

Blogging Idea #16

25 Irritating things you do; which nice people won’t tell you.

#17 After Doing “Forced” TRUMP chat with the guy next car.

Blogging Idea #17

12 Exciting ways in which, Trump has cast his spell on you.

#18 After Doing “Forced” chitchat with a chatty old woman next car

Blogging Idea #18

5 Powerful ways in which, Introverts excel in leadership.

#19 After It starts raining cats and dogs.

Blogging Idea #19

This World Water Day, are you doing your bit to Conserve Water?

#20 After Getting Stuck in traffic for a long long time with no Hope.

Blogging Idea #20

20 Amazing writing ideas I got, while stuck in traffic

Bringing It All Together

I am thankful to all those great writers who had written such fabulous posts on writing. These very posts inspired me to utilize every bit of my available time to work towards honing my writing skills. Hats off also to those writers who advocated usage of commuting time for generation of brilliant ideas for writing.

Remember Writing is easy. All you do is stare at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.

So if you are motivated by this post, get going and start writing today!!!

Found this post useful? Kindly tap the ❤ button below! 🙂

About the author-:

Ravi Rajan is a global IT program manager based out of Mumbai, India. He is also an avid blogger, Haiku poetry writer, archaeology enthusiast and history maniac. Connect with Ravi on LinkedIn, Medium and Twitter.

Reblogged from: https://writingcooperative.com/the-3-minute-read-that-will-make-you-a-great-writer-2a678268904

6 practical ways to practice being present – mindfulness tips

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How many times has my body been in a wonderfully enjoyable  place while my mind was stuck in a worried, angry or fearful place? In Zen Habits, Leo offers some great tips to enjoy the NOW!

Mo

6 Practical Ways to Practice Being Present

Posted: 14 Oct 2016 07:43 AM PDT

By Leo Babauta

There are a lot of amazing benefits to being more present and mindful, but one of my favorites is this: you’re not missing the beauty and joy of the present moment.

Being present also helps you to see when you are feeling fear or resistance, uncertainty or the urge to procrastinate, anger or resentment … and then to work with those difficulties mindfully.

That’s all great, but how do you remember to practice being present? It’s so easy to get caught up in our thoughts and distractions, and forget to practice.

The honest truth is that no one is perfect at this. Me least of all. It’s a continual learning process, not something you figure out and then you’re good. It’s messy and beautiful.

So with that in mind, here are some practical ways to practice:

  1. A Small Regular Practice. Form the simple habit of meditating for just two minutes a day (to start with). After you wake up, simply sit comfortably and try to focus on your breath for two minutes. When (not if) your mind wanders, just notice it and label it “thinking.” And gently return to the breath, without harshness. Set a timer, and when the timer goes off, you’re done! If you feel like expanding it by a minute every week or so, feel free to do so, but you don’t have to expand. The benefit of this regular practice is that you learn skills you can take and practice in other parts of your day.
  2. Work with Others. Having a regular group or partner to meditate with is helpful. You support each other continuing to practice, and can talk about struggles and things you’re learning. If you don’t have a practice group in your area, you could find people online to talk to regularly about practicing.
  3. Have Mindfulness Bells. You could have a chime regularly sound off on your phone or computer (numerous apps do this) to remind you to pause and be mindful of what’s going on right now. I’ve also found it useful to see other things as mindfulness bells: seeing my child’s face, a traffic light, hearing an alert from an appliance or the computer. Each of these can be a reminder to be present when I notice them.
  4. Set an Intention Before an Activity. If you’re about to do a work task, process email, read a book, cook dinner … you can pause just before starting, and think for a second about what your intention for that activity might be. What are you hoping to do with this activity? For me, I might cook dinner out of love for my family or myself. I might write a blog post (like this one) out of love for my readers. I might do a workout out of love for myself (and to set a good example for my kids). I process email out of responsibility and consideration for those trying to communicate with me. By setting an intention, it reminds you to be mindful of that intention as you do any activity.
  5. Reflect Daily. At the end of each day, or at the beginning, take a minute to journal or just reflect on how your day has gone. How have you done with practicing being present? What have you struggled with? Have you been using your mindfulness bells and setting intentions? What resistance has come up for you, what stories are you telling yourself about all of this? Daily reflection is one of the most useful habits for continuing to practice and getting better at practicing.
  6. See Everything as a Teacher. This method admittedly sounds a bit corny, but it’s actually amazing. When you’re feeling frustrated with someone, feeling stressed out by work, feeling upset or grieving about the health of a loved one, feeling anxious about a national election … pause and see this person or situation as a teacher. What can you learn from them about being present? What attachments can you see in yourself that are causing this difficulty? What stories are you forming that are causing you to feel this way? What can you practice letting go of? What can you appreciate about this moment that you are taking for granted? In this way, every difficulty, every person, everything that arises in the present moment can be a loving teacher that is helping us along the path to being present.

Mindfulness for Beginner’s ebook

If you’d like help with mindfulness, check out my new Zen Habits Beginner’s Guide to Mindfulness short ebook.

Declutter Day 10! Progress!

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It’s day 10 of the Minimalism Game…how’s the decluttering? Hope it’s great! I’m sticking with it. If it doesn’t bring me JOY, it is out of here! 30 things are GONE so far! Woohoo! If you haven’t joined the fun, start where you are. Here are the instructions…

https://smp19671.wordpress.com/2016/08/31/30-day-minimalism-game-come-out-and-play/

Mo

Image courtesy of Ericadhawan.com

The Truth is What We Save From the Fire

Recovery programs call our useless running, “getting something we don’t have,” or “keeping something we don’t want to lose.” Greg Baer, in his book, Real Love, calls it “Getting and Protecting Behavior.” Whatever you call it, it’s how we shield ourselves from pain. Check out blogger Matt”s great insights about this tough part of existence! Thanks Matt!
Mo

Must Be This Tall To Ride

Value of hard things vs. easy things Like vigorous exercise, a disciplined reading regiment, and giving more than we take in our marriages, there is VALUE — tons of it — in doing hard things. So maybe don’t run away. Maybe allowing ourselves to feel is THE way. (Image/Carl Richards – New York Times)

I’m afraid of someone using a circular handsaw to cut open my skull.

But I’m more afraid of dying, so if the choice is certain death or brain surgery, I would choose brain surgery.

I’m afraid of jumping off of 100-foot cliffs into unknown waters.

But I’m more afraid of being eaten by big-ass dinosaurs, so if a genetically modified hybrid Jurassic World dinosaur was chasing me, I would totally jump if the alternative was being Indominus Rex’s lunch.

Broken down in the most primitive way possible, human beings are motivated by just two things:

  1. Feeling pleasure
  2. Avoiding pain

Psychologists say most people…

View original post 1,287 more words

30-day Minimalism game! Come out and play!

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I love the Minimalism guys! Let’s play their game for September!  I welcome  your comments on your progress throughout the month! Inspiration to simplify is on the way, one day at a time!

30-Day Minimalism Game.

Here’s how it works …

Find a friend or family member: someone who’s willing to get rid of their excess stuff. This month, each of you must get rid of one thing on the first day. On the second, two things. Three items on the third. So forth, and so on. Anything can go! Clothes, furniture, electronics, tools, decorations, etc. Donate, sell, or trash. Whatever you do, each material possession must be out of your house—and out of your life—by midnight each day.

It’s an easy game at first. However, it starts getting challenging by week two when you’re both jettisoning more than a dozen items each day. Whoever can keep it going the longest wins; you both win if you can make it all month. Bonus points if you play with more than two people.

Ready? Go!

Mo

Let’s Play a Minimalism Game